Midsummer Staycation: Quick Bite

And we’re back! Today dear readers we’re popping a tent and extending our holiday a wee bit longer with a staycation along the shores of the Delaware River, circa 1924. Daniel Garber’s, Junior Camp (c1924), on display at the San Diego Museum of Art, captures an idyllic summer day.

Junior Camp (c1924) by Daniel Garber, San Diego Museum of Art, Photo by cjverb (2019)-400px
Junior Camp (c1924) by Daniel Garber, San Diego Museum of Art, Photo by cjverb (2019)

Nestled beneath a tree, a lone canvas tent provides a respite from the sun. A boat, resting nearby, offers the opportunity to glide down the bright blue river. Zoom in and take a closer look at the farmhouse on the opposite shore. Notice the white chickens fluttering above the roof and pecking at the ground while livestock, perhaps goats or sheep, graze the property.

Garber’s attention to detail is a delight and his painting emits a lazy, laidback vibe. Take a deep breath, drink it all in, and transport yourself to this tranquil scene. Toss in a hammock and cooler filled with icy treats and we’ve got a recipe for sheer bliss.

Washington Crossing the Delaware (1851) by Emanuel Leutze, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Wikimedia Commons
Washington Crossing the Delaware (1851) by Emanuel Leutze, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Wikimedia Commons

Fun Revolutionary Fact:  George Washington and the Continental Army crossed the Delaware River on December 25-26, 1776 to attack a Hessian military post in Trenton, New Jersey. Weary, ill-equipped, and behind schedule, Washington and his troops slogged through an icy storm and strong currents with the hope of gaining a much needed win for the revolution. Click on this George Washington Crossing the Delaware link, courtesy of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association, to learn more.

Daniel Garber (1880-1958) was born in North Manchester, Indiana and raised in a Mennonite family. At age 17, he began his formal training at the Art Academy of Cincinnati. Once complete, Garber enrolled in the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where he subsequently won a two-year scholarship to study in England, France and Italy.

In 1907, Garber returned to the United States and took a job teaching at the Philadelphia School of Design for Women. After two years he accepted a position at his alma mater, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. A well-loved and respected instructor, Garber taught for 40+ years. During this time he and his family settled on a farm in Lumberville, Pennsylvania. Many of Garber’s landscape paintings feature his farm, as well as the local countryside, like the peaceful scene portrayed in Junior Camp (c1924).

Primarily an Impressionist landscape artist, Garber credits the work of Camille Pissaro (1830-1903) and Claude Monet (1840-1926) as his greatest inspiration. In addition to landscape paintings, Garber also painted portraits, particularly of his family. Click on this Daniel Garber link, courtesy of the Philadelphia Museum of Art to view more of his work, including several stunning portraits of his daughter, Tanis.

Philadelphia Art Week Window Display (1922) featuring Daniel Garber's painting, The Orchard Window (1918) Wikimedia Commons
Philadelphia Art Week Window Display (1922) featuring Daniel Garber’s painting, The Orchard Window (1918) Wikimedia Commons

That concludes our midsummer staycation. I’ll be back next week with more Museum Quick Bites. Until then be safe, be kind, and take care!

Hammock by Pexels, Pixabay-100px Cover photo by Pexels, courtesy of Pixabay.

Sources:

American Rivers: Delaware River

Google Arts & Culture: Daniel Garber

Gratz Gallery: Daniel Garber

Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association: George Washington Crossing the Delaware

Philadelphia Museum of Art: Daniel Garber

Pixabay

San Diego Museum of Art

Smithsonian American Art Museum: Daniel Garber

Wikimedia Commons

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