April Showers: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re kicking off the month of April with a stroll along Gustave Caillebotte’s, Paris Street; Rainy Day (Rue de Paris, Temps de Pluie; 1877). This snapshot of late 19th century Paris, captures a busy intersection in the newly modernized City of Light. Considered radical at the time for its seemingly asymmetrical arrangement and cropped figures, Caillebotte’s painting is filled with delightful details.

On the Carpet: Quick Bite

Happy Friday! Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re stepping into Jean-Leon Gérôme’s, The Carpet Merchant (c1887) on display at the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Rich in detail with vibrant colors, this gorgeous painting transports us to the Court of the Rug Market in Cairo.

Crossing Over: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re finally leaving 2020 behind and crossing over into a hopefully happier, sunnier new year. To celebrate, we’re taking a closer look at Claude Monet’s Waterloo Bridge, Sunlight Effect (1903).

La Rue: Quick Bite

Grab your scarf and mittens because today on Museum Quick Bites we’re going for a stroll in the winter sun. Lucien Pissarro’s, La Rue Saint-Vincent, Soleil d’Hiver (St. Vincent Street, Winter Sun; 1890) captures a peaceful scene along a quiet street.

Selfie

Happy Friday! Today on Museum Bites we’re paying tribute to the selfie, old-world style. Before smartphones and selfie sticks, artists painstakingly crafted self-portraits. These vintage selfies were more than just vanity, they were an inexpensive and handy means of experimentation. Join me for a look at a few favorites on display at the Art Institute of Chicago. We begin with the Other Gertrude…

Pedal Power: Part 3

Today on Museum Bites we’re wrapping up our three-part series on bicycles with a tour through the Minneapolis Institute of Art’s (MIA) delightful display of bike art. The MIA teamed up with local bike aficionados, Handsome Cycles to craft three eye-catching bikes based on iconic works featured within their hallowed halls. Hop aboard for a fun ride through art and history. We begin in the French countryside…

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