Blossom: Quick Bite

Winter has gotten real here at Museum Bites, and in defiance of the subzero temperatures and deep snow, we’re going to sample some spring bling. So grab a warm brew and settle in as we wind the clock back to the late 1800s and the origins of the squash-blossom necklace.

Crossing Over: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re finally leaving 2020 behind and crossing over into a hopefully happier, sunnier new year. To celebrate, we’re taking a closer look at Claude Monet’s Waterloo Bridge, Sunlight Effect (1903).

Hear Me Roar: Reboot

Today on Museum Bites we’re taking a closer look at some badass women. This colorful cast includes a champion of women’s health, a defiant ruler, and a steadfast and devoted queen. Rebellious, revolutionary and revered, each took on the system in her own way. For a brief introduction, let’s begin by turning back the clock to ancient Rome…

Black Eye: Quick Bite

Halloween is on the horizon so today on Museum Quick Bites we’re breaking out the face paint. Crafted from hand blown glass, this mint-green confection once held kohl, an ancient eyeliner. Both pretty and practical, this delicate cosmetic container has a whimsical flair.

It’s a Crock! Reboot

Today on Museum Bites we’re sampling crockery with a twist. These deceptively simple mugs and jugs were crafted for pure trickery and played a starring role in the 18th-century’s version of beer pong. Join me for a look at three of these clever devices…

Sacrifice: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re taking a closer look at a Biblical bargain. Jephthah’s Daughter (1874) by Chauncey Bradley Ives is a stunning sculpture depicting a young woman’s grief upon learning she will be sacrificed (spoiler alert!)…by her father. With head downcast, a tambourine grasped loosely in one hand, she contemplates her tragic fate.

Bejeweled: Quick Bite

We’re getting our glam on today at Museum Quick Bites with a stunning Bukharan headdress crafted in the mid to late 1800s. Made of gilt silver and decorated with rubies, mardjon and colored glass, this ceremonial headdress has an exotic vibe.

Walking Wounded: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re taking a stroll with Alberto Giacometti’s, Three Men Walking II (1948-1949), on display at the Art Institute of Chicago. Gaunt and gangly, Giacometti crafted a series of these bronze figures to symbolize the physical and emotional trauma he and others were experiencing after World War II.

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