The Avenger: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re taking a closer look at Ernst Barlach’s, The Avenger (1922), a bronzed beauty that bristles with intensity. Bent at the hip and balancing on one foot with a sword clasped in his hands, The Avenger lunges toward an unseen foe. His flowy robes resemble those of a whirling dervish. If it wasn’t for the sword, The Avenger would appear to be skating or executing a tricky yoga pose. Aside from his pursed lips, his expression appears blank. Is he numb to the task?

Recreate!

Dear Readers -- My daughter and I took a stab at recreating Artemisia Gentileschi's Judith and Her Maidservant with the Head of Holofernes (c1623-1625--see photo comparison below) as part of the Detroit Institute of Arts #RecreateDIA challenge. It was a lot of fun, especially adding the COVID-19 twist 😉 Hope you enjoy! ~cjverb

Mom: Quick Bite

Mother’s Day is on the horizon and today on Museum Quick Bites we’re celebrating moms with a look at George de Forest Brush’s Mother and Child (c1897-1900). With rosy cheeks and wispy curls framing their faces, this adorable pair is timeless.

Color Me Happy: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re diving headfirst into a whimsical wave of color. Series I-No. 3 (1918) by Georgia O'Keeffe features a lush, multi-colored swirl that brings to mind candy canes and lollipops. Its Willy Wonka vibe conjures up a world of pure imagination.

Comfort Food: Quick Bite

Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re sinking our teeth into some comfort food with a dash of Dutch flavor. Pieter Claesz’s Still Life with a Pie, Sweetmeats, and Wine Glasses (c1625) beckons us to grab a plate and indulge. Lemons, olives, nuts, a crusty loaf of bread, and a meat pie—its citrusy filling tumbling out—are so exquisitely realistic, it looks as if you could reach in and gobble them up.

In Harmony: Quick Bite

Dear Readers – Today on Museum Quick Bites we’re taking comfort in music with an angelic twist. Musical Angel (1521) by Rosso Fiorentino (aka Giovanni Battista di Jacopo; 1494-1540) features a cherub dreamily plucking a lute. From his rosy fingertips to his fiery red curls this sleepy-eyed angel appears lulled by the music, and in turn, the painting lulls us.

Let’s Dance: Quick Bite

Dear Readers –Today on Museum Quick Bites, we’re continuing to seek out comfort, this time through dance. Bacchante with Infant Faun (1894) by Frederick W. MacMonnies (1863-1937) features a young woman kicking up her heels in a lively dance. She is a bacchante, a follower of Bacchus, the Roman god of wine, symbolized by the grapes clutched in her right hand. A baby faun, a mythical creature that is half human and half goat, is cradled in her left arm. The infant stares hungrily at the grapes, unfazed by the bacchante’s exuberance. Together, the two are a blend of joy and yearning.

Comfort Outside: Quick Bite

Dear Readers – I hope you are well and adjusting to our new version of normal. This week’s Museum Quick Bite is all about getting outside. In this new phase of social distancing and sheltering in place, now more than ever we need a dose of outside time whether that means going for a walk, sipping cocktails on the patio, or feasting our eyes on some gorgeous outdoor art, like Norwegian painter, Thomas Fearnley’s (1802-1842) Pergola with Oranges (c1834)…

Comfort: Quick Bite

Dear Readers – COVID-19 has us living in a surreal and difficult time. Despite my best efforts to proceed in this new normal of sheltering in place and social distancing, I’m having a hard time concentrating. So I’m going to switch things up. Instead of my usual format, I’m going to offer Museum Quick Bites. These weekly snippets will focus on a single piece of art and artist. Our theme for the next several weeks will be scenes of comfort, something I think we all need right now. Stay safe. – CJ Verb

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